News

Freedom Summer and the unfinished work of the civil rights movement (al Jazeera)

25 June, 2014

by Alice Driver

A 1965 photograph of a couple in the Mississippi Delta arriving to register to vote [Copyright: Mary Elizabeth King]

You can’t think that the civil rights movement was only Martin Luther King. It was a wide variety of people, black and white, young and old,” explained US civil rights leader Julian Bond.

Bond was a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960. For several years, he worked alongside activist Mary King, handling communications, which sometimes played a life-or-death role for the movement.

“Public understanding was crucial to our strategy,” King notes. 

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Guest Post about Mary King by Alice L. Driver, School of Authentic Journalism

15 May, 2013

This article by Alice L. Driver, School of Authentic Journalism, Class of 2013, was originally published as“US Civil Rights-Era Leader Mary King Says Successful Social Movements Expand Space for Other Struggles” on Narconews.com

Mary King has earned international acclaim for her writing and work focused on social justice movements around the globe. But the important role she played in helping to advance the struggle for women’s rights is a lesser known story of how the success of one social movement, the US civil rights struggle, helped to expand the space for another movement.


Mary King at the inaugural dinner of the 2013 School of Authentic Journalism in Mexico. DR 2013 Noah Friedman-Rudovsky.

King’s consciousness of women’s rights was shaped years ago by her organizing and media work for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), an organizing group at the heart of the U.S. civil rights movement that played out in the 1960s.

From a tiny spark, the kind produced by pure belief in something and by the wild and willful certainty of youth, Mary King, while with the SNCC, is credited with helping to plant a seed for the modern women’s rights movement.

King spoke recently about that history while attending the Narco News School of Authentic Journalism — an intensive workshop focused on journalism and social movements held in Mexico from April 17-27 (you can find a slideshow with more photos of the workshop by Alice L. Driver here).
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