Introduction

Mary King Gandhi’s shrewd insight that conflict offers an opportunity to rearrange the ingredients that produced it in the first place has yet to be fully appreciated. Yet as more and more groups and societies across the world are able to know of the successful use of nonviolent tools to achieve political goals, it is possible that universal recognition of the worth and practicality of settling conflict without the insertion of violence may also grow. If anything, the inclination is toward greater use of the technique of collective nonviolent action in the twenty-first century. This website is about the power and limits of nonviolent civil resistance through the eyes of one of its practitioner scholars.



The Latest from Mary

“Communications, and Why It’s Vital for Today’s Nonviolent Campaigns and Movements” by Mary King

October 7, 2019 | News

“How South Africa forced Gandhi to reckon with racism and imperialism” by Mary King

October 1, 2019 | News

“How South Africa forced Gandhi to reckon with racism and imperialism” by Mary King.

Born 150 years ago, Gandhi’s perceptions about human sensibilities, social power and political truths began their transformation not in India, but South Africa.

This is Part One of a two-part analysis.

Waging Nonviolence is a free online magazine with weekly newsletters.

“Can we celebrate Gandhi’s achievements while also learning from his errors?” by Mary King

October 1, 2019 | News

“Can we celebrate Gandhi’s achievements while also learning from his errors?” by Mary King

While Gandhi is rightly criticized on untouchability and gender issues, his method of struggle has informed countless social movements over the last century.

This is Part Two of a two-part analysis, and was originally published on October 4.

Waging Nonviolence is a free online magazine with weekly newsletters.

“Mary King: On Nonviolent Civil Resistance” by Carla Morena Alvarez Velasco

September 1, 2019 | News

“Mary King: On Nonviolent Civil Resistance” by Carla Morena Alvarez Velasco

Dr. Alvarez’s interview is provided in both Spanish and English.

“Julian Bond Oral History Project: Mary King and Peter Bourne”

April 20, 2019 | Videos and Radio

“Julian Bond Oral History Project: Mary King and Peter Bourne”: An interview with Mary King and Peter Bourne for the Julian Bond Oral History Project, sponsored by the School of Public Affairs at American University.

Ramachandra Guha praises Mary King’s “Gandhian Nonviolent Struggle and Untouchability in South India: The 1924-25 Vykom Satyagraha and the Mechanisms of Change” as “excellent” in his recent essay, “Remembering Vaikom satyagraha in the light of Sabarimala [Hindu temple]”.

March 4, 2019 | News

Renowned historian Ramachandra Guha acclaims Mary King’s “Gandhian Nonviolent Struggle and Untouchability in South India: The 1924-25 Vykom Satyagraha and the Mechanisms of Change” as an “excellent” source for his recent essay, “Remembering Vaikom satyagraha in the light of Sabarimala [Hindu temple]”, concerning the temple in Kerala, that has long banned women.

Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr: The Power of Nonviolent Action, now available online at UNESCO

September 18, 2018 | News

“Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr: The Power of Nonviolent Action” is now available for reading on the UNESCO site.

Soul Music (BBC Radio 4): “Songs of the Civil Rights Movement”

April 4, 2018 | Videos and Radio

“Songs of the Civil Rights Movement”: Actor Clarke Peters narrates a special edition of Soul Music marking fifty years since the assassination of the Reverend Dr Martin Luther King on April 4th 1968.

“If in doubt, pray and sing” an activist recalls how music was used as part of Dr King’s non-violent resistance movement.

This edition of Soul Music tells the stories of the songs behind the Civil Rights Movement including the spirituals and freedom songs that were integral to the struggle. In the 19th century, music became a tool for protest and resistance among the enslaved peoples of the American South. The programme hears the stories behind some of the most popular anthems and Freedom Songs that were later used as part of the civil resistance movement that eventually led to voting rights and desegregation. From Swing Low Sweet Chariot and We Shall Overcome to Amazing Grace, Strange Fruit and A Change Is Gonna Come, witnesses to and participants in the Civil Rights Movement recall how songs were such a vital part of the story.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

“Scholar and Practitioner of Nonviolence: The Life and Work of Mary Elizabeth King,” by Dagmar Wernitznig

July 5, 2017 | News

Scholar and Practitioner of Nonviolence: The Life and Work of Mary Elizabeth King,” by Dagmar Wernitznig, Online Journal of Studies on Women’s Memory (2017)

Soul Music (BBC Radio 4): “A Change Is Gonna Come, by Sam Cooke”

October 15, 2016 | Videos and Radio

“A Change Is Gonna Come, by Sam Cooke”: Soul Music explores a song that has become synonymous with the American Civil Rights Movement, Sam Cooke’s A Change Is Gonna Come released in December 1964 two weeks after he was shot dead in Los Angeles. Contributors include Sam Cooke’s brother LC, singer Bettye Lavette who sang it for Barack Obama at his inaugural ceremony and civil rights activists from the Freedom Summer of 64, Jennifer Lawson and Mary King.
Producer: Maggie Ayre.